Bank Cormorant

Often enjoying a broad diet including klipfish, rock lobster and more, the increasing rarety of the Bank Cormorant makes every moment we see them even more special.

Written by edna, May 22 2012

Bank Cormorant

Often enjoying a broad diet including klipfish, rock lobster and more, the increasing rarety of the Bank Cormorant makes every moment we see them even more special.

Conservation information

Conservation status: Endangered

This species is entirely black, occasionally with a white rump. They are heavier than the Cape Cormorant, reaching 75 cm in size, and have a dark bill and eye, as well as a small crest on the head. Bank Cormorants breed in small colonies on islands off the west coast, with seaweed nests generally constructed on top of large boulders.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Resident bird expert and Dyer Island Cruises director Wilfred Chivell shares his extensive knowledge on the bank cormorant.

Population – What do they eat and how many are there?

Their dives are shallow and they feed in kelp beds, with klipfish, gobies, rock lobster, octopus and cuttlefish being the main prey consumed. In recent years, Bank Cormorant numbers have decreased dramatically in southern Africa, due primarily to scarcity of food and competition with seals. Today the population trend is decreasing and the species is classified as Endangered (IUCN Red List Category).

Fun Fact: Laying large eggs, bank cormorants breed throughout the year and construct their nests using seaweed and guano.

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